Map of the Day: Jobs Report Is Mixed, but Future Looks Brighter Nationwide

Another mixed jobs report for Obama. The unemployment rate dropped to 9.5 percent even though the economy lost 125,000 jobs last month, mainly because 225,000 Census jobs were eliminated. But if it's any comfort to the White House, Moody's is predicting a bullish jobs market for 2011.

The map below, produced by USA Today and based on stats from Moody's, measures the labor market in the first quarter of 2010 vs. the forecast for the first quarter of 2011. As you can see, it shows every state gaining jobs and Texas booming. But perhaps more interestingly, government jobs are expected to be decimated.

Nevada will see a -4.0 percent slice in government jobs, Oklahoma a -2.8 percent drop, and New Jersey a -2.8 percent decline (Chris Christie is definitely causing a stir on this front). Declining jobs is usually a bad thing, but isn't decreased government spending what people want?

The Time cover story last week on the dire situation of the states caused some alarm about irresponsible and unrealistic budgets, but the New York Times warning about governments repeating the mistake of the 1930s in cutting spending too early also caused some concern in economic circles.

Ultimately, voters won't care about forecasts or stats, but just their own well-being.

One Year Jobs Forecast for US

Government Jobs Forecast

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Patrick Ottenhoff has been writing The Electoral Map blog since 2007. A former staff writer for National Journal Group and project manager at New Media Strategies, he now attends Georgetown's McDonough School of Business. More

Patrick Ottenhoff attends Georgetown McDonough School of Business in the Class of 2012. He previously served as a project manager in the Public Affairs Practice of New Media Strategies and was a staff writer for National Journal Group. Patrick has been writing The Electoral Map blog since 2007. As the name implies, the blog covers news and commentary at the intersection of politics and geography, but it also analyzes the stories, people, culture, sports, and food behind the maps and the votes. Patrick is a native Virginian and graduate of Union College in New York. You can follow The Electoral Map on Twitter and Facebook, and follow Patrick on YouTube.

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