Map of the Day: Different Shades of Peach State Politics

Atlanta has reinvented itself in the last 50 years as the "city too busy to hate." It has the nation's busiest airport; it's home to the headquarters of several global mega-brands, including Coca-Cola; and it's the hub of an emerging megapolis stretching to Charlotte.

But race still serves as the political backdrop in the state that gave rise to both Ty Cobb and Martin Luther King, Jr. Georgia's white voters gave Barack Obama the fourth lowest percentage of their vote in the nation, behind only Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi.

The map below from Electoral Geography shows Obama's share of the white vote per county.  He received almost half in Atlanta, Athens, and Savannah. He did the worst in the Black Belt counties of the Coastal Plains.

He did decently in the northern mountains, home to Nathan Deal (a former Democrat). These counties never had many slaves, and, as JMart has noted, areas in the former Confederacy with fewer African Americans "still retain a healthy two-party system."

What does this all mean in today's Georgia primaries? Not much by itself -- it's dangerous to draw direct correlations, and South Carolina Republicans nominated a black House candidate last month -- but it's still one of the best geographical representations of Georgia's electorate.

Georgia White Vote for Obama

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Patrick Ottenhoff has been writing The Electoral Map blog since 2007. A former staff writer for National Journal Group and project manager at New Media Strategies, he now attends Georgetown's McDonough School of Business. More

Patrick Ottenhoff attends Georgetown McDonough School of Business in the Class of 2012. He previously served as a project manager in the Public Affairs Practice of New Media Strategies and was a staff writer for National Journal Group. Patrick has been writing The Electoral Map blog since 2007. As the name implies, the blog covers news and commentary at the intersection of politics and geography, but it also analyzes the stories, people, culture, sports, and food behind the maps and the votes. Patrick is a native Virginian and graduate of Union College in New York. You can follow The Electoral Map on Twitter and Facebook, and follow Patrick on YouTube.

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