Did Meg Whitman Buy a Coveted Political Consultant?

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In the financial disclosures Meg Whitman filed when she launched her run for governor, one investment stands out: an errant $1 million allocated to a relatively unknown entertainment company. Upon inspection, the New York Times found that this company is owned by Mike Murphy, a prominent Republican strategist who signed on to Whitman's campaign after an extended flirtation with that of her rival, Steve Poizner. Given Murphy's track record of installing Arnold Schwarzenegger in the California governor's mansion and advising GOP all-stars John McCain and Mitt Romney, one can't help but question the impetus behind Whitman's sudden foray into entertainment funding:

The timing of the investment and its unusual nature -- Ms. Whitman lists no other holdings in the world of independent movie production -- raise some questions about its ultimate purpose: Was it strictly a business decision, or part of an effort to ensure that a coveted political strategist did not work for the competition? Or perhaps a way to sweeten the pot so he would eventually sign on with the right team?

Read the full story at the New York Times.

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Nicole Allan is a former senior editor at The Atlantic.

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