What Should Political Journalists Do?

Jay Rosen, the New York University press critic, has written a treatise on what he calls the "actual ideology of the American press."  It is compelling and provocative, and I recommend a full read. I also think it leaves out something quite important: if the ideologies he identifies -- the pathologies, actually -- are the sum total of the media, what would Jay Rosen, if he were running the world, have us do? Is there a distinction between journalism and ideological argument? Is it methodological? Are there times when, given the difficulty of discovering a truth, journalists can and should adopt a disinterested or disembodied stance?  His criticism applies largely to political journalism, and so  I anticipate his answer. 

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Marc Ambinder is an Atlantic contributing editor. He is also a senior contributor at Defense One, a contributing editor at GQ, and a regular contributor at The Week.

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