Maps of the Day: The Pentagon's Maps of Afghanistan

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Before the Pentagon's top man in Afghanistan trashed the commander-in-chief to the magazine that once put Jane Fonda on its cover, the Pentagon released its own official progress report on Afghanistan in April. Four maps in the 151-page report caught my attention:

-- The first one shows insurgent areas of operation in Afghanistan. The purple is the Taliban and the small circles show Al Qaeda concentration.

-- The next one shows areas of opium cultivation. Perhaps not coincidentally, Taliban-controlled areas cultivate very high levels of opium.

-- The third one displays the population's attitude toward the government in 121 key districts.  However, Ann Marlowe noted on the National Review's website that the "key" districts don't include ones that "American officers have described to me as so dangerous that it would take a company-level operation to move 20 kilometers."

-- And the last one illustrates where the government has authority. Green is "full authority," while red is "non-existent."

Insurgent Areas of Operation in Afghanistan

Pentagon's Expected Opium Cultivation in Afghanistan in 2010

Pentagon's Overall Assessment of Key Districts in Afghanistan

Penatgon's District Level Governance Assessment

The full report is available in PDF here: "Report on Progress Toward Security and Stability in Afghanistan."

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Patrick Ottenhoff has been writing The Electoral Map blog since 2007. A former staff writer for National Journal Group and project manager at New Media Strategies, he now attends Georgetown's McDonough School of Business. More

Patrick Ottenhoff attends Georgetown McDonough School of Business in the Class of 2012. He previously served as a project manager in the Public Affairs Practice of New Media Strategies and was a staff writer for National Journal Group. Patrick has been writing The Electoral Map blog since 2007. As the name implies, the blog covers news and commentary at the intersection of politics and geography, but it also analyzes the stories, people, culture, sports, and food behind the maps and the votes. Patrick is a native Virginian and graduate of Union College in New York. You can follow The Electoral Map on Twitter and Facebook, and follow Patrick on YouTube.
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