Crist Hanging On in Florida

It appears the decision to run as an independent was a good one: Florida Gov. Charlie Crist is hanging onto the lead in his multi-way Senate race, Hotline OnCall's Reid Wilson points out.


Since leaving the GOP on April 29, Crist has led in most major polls (the exception being two Rasmussen surveys) in the low single digits. Rasmussen now shows him tied, and a new poll from the Florida Chamber of Commerce shows Crist taking a huge lead over Rubio and Democrat Kendrick Meek--42%-31%-14%, respectively.

The governor also enjoyed a significant cash advantage as of his last quarterly FEC filing in April: $7.6 million to Rubio's $3.9 million and Meek's $3.7 million. Jeff Greene, the Democratic primary candidate who could threaten Meek, is self funding with billions in personal wealth.

Here's Pollster.com's chart of major polls on this race, which does not include the Florida Chamber of Commerce survey:

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Chris Good is a political reporter for ABC News. He was previously an associate editor at The Atlantic and a reporter for The Hill.

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