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The Senate will decide TOMORROW what the schedule is for completing work on financial regulatory reform. Suffice it to say, there will be some Dems who won't get to offer the amendments they wanted. 

The RNC meets this week, Watch for: WEDNESDAY's announcement that Tampa will be chosen as the site of the 2012 Republican National Convention. I'm 90 percent sure of that. Other finalists are Salt Lake City and Phoenix.

Within the RNC, there are rumors that Michael Steele plans more staff shake-ups, but the truth is that there isn't a lot of staff left to shake. 

The Temporary Delegate Selection Committee presents its suggestion about the 2012 nominating process. There will be a formal vote in the first week of August in Detroit.

The last e-mail I got in my inbox before publishing: " Am. Assn. of Orthodontists Supports Small Business Safe Harbor Amendment in Senate Financial Bill." Got that?

Sprint is testing its 4G network in Washington, D.C. You're not supposed to notice, but they are. Full 4G coverage available very soon. (This is a tip, not an advertisement.)

Please remember this about Utah: it chooses candidates by CONVENTION. Sen. Bennett was well-liked by most Republican primary voters in his states. But conventions draw the most conservative, most active voters in the party. There's a reason why party conservatives like conventions or caucuses and party moderates like regular primaries.

Here's a dangerous idea: British schools by the hundreds are going to boycott today's national standards tests. Teachers don't like teaching to the test. Also: a couple of British leaders are boycotting their responsibility to form a government. With every passing moment, the LibDems' signature reform goal, PR -- proportional representation (voting-system reform) comes closer to a negotiated reality.

Speaking of school standards: the administration says that schools in Delaware and Tennesee are Racing to the Top of the heap. But a Harvard University study disagrees, giving Tennessee schools an "F" and Delaware schools a "C-."

There is a lot of anxiety in the defense community about Sec. Gates's speech on the defense budget, but be sure to notice this sentence too: "I do think that as we look to the future, particularly for the next couple of years or so while we're in Iraq and Afghanistan, I think the Congress and the president would look long and hard at another military operation that would cost us $100 billion a year."  The U.S. won't be going to war with Iran anytime soon.

You probably also missed his statement that no legislation is required to cut overhead and the number of general officer slots. Even if this is true, it will be tremendously difficult to pull off. For one thing, a lot of politicians have a lot of capital invested in certain general officers and candidates. The iron triangle depends on the conversion rate of 2 Stars to 3 Stars. (How is that periodic call to reduce the number of Senate-confirmed positions going?)

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Marc Ambinder is an Atlantic contributing editor. He is also a senior contributor at Defense One, a contributing editor at GQ, and a regular contributor at The Week.

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