Taxi to the Dark Side of the Hilton

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On Saturday night, I went to the White House Correspondents' Dinner. I couldn't help but be surprised when I bumped into Donald Rumsfeld, whom I had accused, in my film "Taxi to the Dark Side," of being responsible, by issuing explicit orders and under his command authority as Secretary of Defense, for sanctioning torture.


Since it was such a pleasant event, I thought it might be fun to pose for a picture. Notably we are standing, which is appropriate, since he was famous for mocking the forced standing of detainees. (In a handwritten note for a Special Interrogation Plan on Guantanamo, he wondered what the big deal was about "forced standing" since he worked at a standing desk.  Of course, he was not shackled to the ceiling, though I suppose we would have to double-check that with Dick Cheney.)

Dandy Don was in a festive mood, flirting with women and raving over the $100,000 bet someone had made on the Kentucky Derby. I was introduced as an Oscar Winner, which seemed to please him. After the photo, Rumsfeld wondered what film of mine had won. It was about Abu Ghraib, someone said.

"Abu Ghraib..." mused Rumsfeld, in an inscrutable, Yoda-like manner and construction, "that was a terrible thing." Then he smiled and disappeared into the crowd.

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Alex Gibney is a documentary filmmaker who made Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room. He has won an Emmy, a Peabody, the duPont Columbia Award, and a Grammy. More

Alex Gibney is the writer, director and producer of the 2008 Oscar-winning documentary Taxi to the Dark Side, the Oscar-nominated film Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room, and Gonzo: The Life and Work of Dr. Hunter S. Thompson, narrated by Johnny Depp. In post-production on My Trip to Al Qaeda, based on the play by Pulitzer Prize–winning author Lawrence Wright, Gibney is also filming a documentary on Lance Armstrong. Gibney served as executive producer for No End in Sight, which was also nominated for an Oscar; a producer for Herbie Hancock: Possibilities, a film about the jazz legend's collaboration with musical talents such as Santana, Sting, and Christina Aguilera; and consulting producer on Who Killed the Electric Car. Gibney's producing credits also include the classic concert film Lightning in a Bottle, directed by Antoine Fuqua; The Blues, an Emmy-nominated series of seven films in association with executive producer Martin Scorsese; and The Trials of Henry Kissinger. Gibney is the recipient of many awards including the Emmy, the Peabody, the duPont Columbia Award, and the Grammy.

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