Ed Case Doesn't Let Special Election Loss Get Him Down

Hawaii's First Congressional District voters elected Republican Charles Djou on Saturday to represent them in Congress, and, if you're Democrat Ed Case, what can you really do about it?


Not much. That's why Case, who unexpectedly finished third behind Djou and fellow Democrat Colleen Hanabusa (whom Case had led consistently in this three-way race), e-mailed his supporters today to thank them for their had work and let them know that he's trying to move on, including a link to a photo of himself bodysurfing on Sunday.

Case wrote in the e-mail, sent last night Honolulu time:
Today I actually did go bodysurfing at Point Panic, get a start on cleaning up my mess of a yard, and spend time with my family. But tomorrow is a new day, the start of our next chapters together, and I'm excited to begin anew. I welcome your own thoughts, and eagerly look forward to continuing our work together.

Here's the photo to which Case linked:
Case bodysurfing.jpg
It's a pretty upbeat way to move on from a special election loss. Then again, when you live in Hawaii, how worried can you really be about these things? It's better than moping.

Case moves on from this race having established himself as the favored candidate of DC Democrats. If he wants to, he can vie for his party's nomination to challenge Djou in November, as the lone Democratic candidate in the race. If he got the nomination he would probably win. Sen. Daniel Akaka's Senate seat will be open in 2012; Case challenged Akaka in 2006 and could potentially do so again.
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Chris Good is a political reporter for ABC News. He was previously an associate editor at The Atlantic and a reporter for The Hill.

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