Massa Will Appear on Glenn Beck Tuesday

In case anyone needed further confirmation that Rep. Eric Massa is completely off the Democratic reservation, here it is: he's appearing on Glenn Beck's show tomorrow afternoon, for the full hour of programming.

Beck tweeted earlier today that he'd booked Massa for Tuesday at 5 p.m., mentioning that he'd spoken to Massa and that people need to hear what the lawmaker has to say. Given Beck's excitement, it probably means the congressman (who, by then, will be a former congressman) won't have nice things to say about Democrats in Congress.

"Tomorrow at five: congressman Massa for the full hour. I just spoke with him off air. All Americans need To hear him. Exclusive 2morrow fox," Beck tweeted.

Massa said last week that he would step down because of a cancer scare--not because of the House ethics investigation into his alleged sexual harassment of a male staffer-- when news broke on the same day, last Wednesday, that he wouldn't seek reelection and that the House ethics committee was investigating him.

Over the weekend, he said on his WKPQ radio show that he had been forced out by Democratic leaders seeking to eliminate his "no" vote on health care.

"Mine is now the deciding vote on the health care bill," Massa said. "This administration and this House leadership have said, quote-unquote, they will stop at nothing to pass this health care bill. And now they've gotten rid of me and it will pass. You connect the dots."

Politico cited House aides in its original story about Massa's investigation; the outlet later reported that House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-MD) had known about the investigation.

In response to Massa's insinuation that leadership forced him out with the leak, Hoyer spokeswoman Katie Grant said, "That's completely false. There is zero merit to that accusation."

It's unclear whether or not Massa's claim of being the deciding vote is true. The House vote margins on health care seem fluid, for now: as House Democrats wait for assurances from the Senate that their preferred "fixes" will be added to the bill they pass via reconciliation in the upper chamber, lawmakers haven't said for sure whether they'll vote "yes." Rep. Bart Stupak is whipping votes against the Senate bill, which does not include his abortion amendment.

Expect more from Massa on his theory about being forced out. Hoyer will appear on MSNBC tomorrow at 4 p.m., and hour before Massa's Beck appearance.

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Chris Good is a political reporter for ABC News. He was previously an associate editor at The Atlantic and a reporter for The Hill.

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