Reid, Lieberman Spoke This Morning; Both Put Out Statements On Relationship

Both Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and Sen. Joe Lieberman have issued statements on their recent Medicare buy-in dust-up--specifically, over Reid's quote in The New York Times Magazine that Lieberman had "double-crossed" him by announcing on "Face the Nation" that he opposed the Medicare buy-in provision in the Senate health reform bill--and, according to a Lieberman staffer, the two senators spoke this morning.

The statements appear to have been coordinated, to some extent, as the Lieberman staffer said Lieberman's office was aware of Reid's statement before it was put out.
Here's what Reid said, in a statement released by his office this afternoon: "Senator Lieberman and I have a very open and honest working relationship. On issues ranging from foreign policy to health care, even when we disagree, he has always been straight forward [sic] with me."

Shortly thereafter, Lieberman released this statement through his office, responding to Reid's: "I appreciate Senator Reid's statement in response to the comments attributed to him in the New York Times Magazine.  As Senator Reid indicated in his statement, he believes, as do I, that we have always been honest with each other and any suggestion otherwise is simply false and contrary to the truth."

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Chris Good is a political reporter for ABC News. He was previously an associate editor at The Atlantic and a reporter for The Hill.

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