O'Keefe: "I Am A Journalist. The Truth Shall Set Me Free."

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That's what conservative filmmaker James O'Keefe had to say on Twitter late last night about getting arrested by the FBI for allegedly conspiring/attempting to wiretap the telephone system in Sen. Mary Landrieu's (D-LA) office in New Orleans [UPDATE: Law enforcement says it wasn't an attempted bugging--see below]. O'Keefe tweeted last night: "I am a journalist. The truth shall set me free."

O'Keefe and three other young men (one of whom is the son of the acting U.S. attorney in Shreveport) were charged with entering federal property under false pretenses with intent to commit a felony.

Speaking of journalism, also high up on O'Keefe's Twitter feed is a suggestion of journalistic tactics: "@JillStanek follow around and videotape CNN photographers at pro-life marches - it would delegitimize them."

O'Keefe and his partner in the ACORN sting videos, Hannah Giles, are facing a new lawsuit from ACORN, filed in Pennsylvania just days before the New Orleans arrest: an ACORN employee is suing them for secretly taping a conversation and disseminating the material with an intent to damage the plaintiff. In Pennsylvania, all parties must be aware when a conversation is recorded, according to The Philadelphia Inquirer. ACORN filed suit against O'Keefe and Giles in Maryland in September.

(Via Ian Faerstein, who has, by the way, taken a comprehensive pulse of opinions on Obama around the Web ahead of his State of the Union speech.)

UPDATE:
A law enforcement official, according to several media outlets, said O'Keefe and the three others weren't trying to wiretap Landrieu's office; rather, they were trying to find out how staffers would react if the office phone system was inoperable.

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Chris Good is a political reporter for ABC News. He was previously an associate editor at The Atlantic and a reporter for The Hill.

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