Obama Can Kill The BCS With One Gesture

We all know that the First Fan is not a fan of the Bowl Championship Series, and, in his capacity as an average citizen, supports a playoff system to determine the national champion of college football. Sen. Orrin Hatch, an equally vocal opponent of the BCS, has just given the president a perfect chance to use the informal powers of the president to send a strong message to the NCAA.
Hatch, in a letter to the White House, wants both Alabama -- the formal BCS champion -- and Boise State, which also went undefeated, invited to meet with the president. Doing so "will not erase the unfairness of the past," Hatch says, referring to instances in 2004 and 2008 when the University of Utah's football team went unbeaten but did not make into the BCS system. Such a gesture would send a message that America -- in the person of the president -- does not recognize the BCS's ability to determine a champion.

Here's Hatch's letter: 2010_01_14_12_05_58.pdf

(Update: the White House won't play. Only Alabama will get the invite.)

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Marc Ambinder is an Atlantic contributing editor. He is also a senior contributor at Defense One, a contributing editor at GQ, and a regular contributor at The Week.

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