New Yorkers Narrowly Support Location of Terror Trials

With all the debate over whether it's right--or safe--to try Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and the alleged 9/11 conspirators in New York, we might as well take New Yorkers' opinions into account. According to Marist, they support the decision--narrowly. 45 percent like it, 41 percent don't, and 14 percent are undecided. In political polling, 14 percent undecided usually indicates that opinion is fluid, that those 14 percent could swing either way depending on a number of factors. This issue is not so much political as it is moral and instinctive, though we may see other polls with slightly different figures.

On the question of whether the trials will, 67 percent of New Yorkers say they are confident that law enforcement officials will be able to handle any potential risks. 22 percent say they're not, and 11 percent are unsure.

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Chris Good is a political reporter for ABC News. He was previously an associate editor at The Atlantic and a reporter for The Hill.

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