The Case for Selling the Lincoln Bedroom

One of the overlooked stories of the week was The Washington Times account of big donors getting special visits and perks at the White House. No reports of the Lincoln Bedroom being used, but the efforts of the Times to stir the outrage that fueled conservative anger at the Clintons in the 90s is not surprising. But it is misplaced. Big donors or bundlers will always be with us, even in the McCain-Feingold era. They will get special treatment from presidents. The question is what kind of perks they get. If they get an NSC briefing or sleepover--not as a direct quid pro quo but as some sort of gesture of gratitude--seems reasonable to me, especially versus say writing legislation. If you have to give them something ego flattering, why not some time in America's house?

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Matthew Cooper is a managing editor (White House) for National Journal.

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