The Case for Selling the Lincoln Bedroom

More

One of the overlooked stories of the week was The Washington Times account of big donors getting special visits and perks at the White House. No reports of the Lincoln Bedroom being used, but the efforts of the Times to stir the outrage that fueled conservative anger at the Clintons in the 90s is not surprising. But it is misplaced. Big donors or bundlers will always be with us, even in the McCain-Feingold era. They will get special treatment from presidents. The question is what kind of perks they get. If they get an NSC briefing or sleepover--not as a direct quid pro quo but as some sort of gesture of gratitude--seems reasonable to me, especially versus say writing legislation. If you have to give them something ego flattering, why not some time in America's house?

Jump to comments
Presented by

Matthew Cooper is a managing editor (White House) for National Journal.

Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

What Is a City?

Cities are like nothing else on Earth.


Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

What Is a City?

Cities are like nothing else on Earth.

Video

CrossFit Versus Yoga: Choose a Side

How a workout becomes a social identity

Video

Is Technology Making Us Better Storytellers?

The minds behind House of Cards and The Moth weigh in.

Video

A Short Film That Skewers Hollywood

A studio executive concocts an animated blockbuster. Who cares about the story?

Video

In Online Dating, Everyone's a Little Bit Racist

The co-founder of OKCupid shares findings from his analysis of millions of users' data.

Video

What Is a Sandwich?

We're overthinking sandwiches, so you don't have to.

Video

Let's Talk About Not Smoking

Why does smoking maintain its allure? James Hamblin seeks the wisdom of a cool person.

Writers

Up
Down

More in Politics

Just In