Two Brief Predictions About Health Care

1. Sen. Harry Reid's decision will generate an intense negative reaction among activist Democrats and liberals. Bad Harry, weak Harry.  But I suspect that the ratcheting down of pressure will be somewhat of a relief to the Finance Committee negotiators. Less pressure means more time to think -- and to haggle civilly, as opposed to haggling with a looming deadline.


2. The journalistic schema heading into the weekend will be that unless Obama gets a "gamechanger," health care reform is dead. Props to the journalist who manages to at least modify this metaphor and posits that Obama needs to get inside his opponents' OODA loop. I don't agree with this schema, but the opposite schema -- this is a deceptively good development for the Democrats -- is equally as intellectually unsatisfying.
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Marc Ambinder is an Atlantic contributing editor. He is also a senior contributor at Defense One, a contributing editor at GQ, and a regular contributor at The Week.

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