Sotomayor Wouldn't Mind Cameras in Supreme Court?

Though cameras in the courtroom were by no means favored by Justice David Souter (he warned they'd have to "roll over my dead body" to get into the Supreme Court), it sounds like his potential replacement wouldn't mind them. Sonia Sotomayor gave a non-answer to Sen. Herb Kohl's (D-WI) question about cameras in the Supreme Court this morning, on the second day of her Senate confirmation hearing. She's had good experiences with cameras in her appellate courtroom when participating in experiments, she acknowledged today, and Sotomayor said she makes it a practice, when coming to a new court, to "understand and listen to my colleagues about why certain practices were necessary or helpful, or why certain practices were necessary or helpful, or why certain practices shouldn't be done or new procedures tried, and then spend my time trying to convince them."

Sotomayor said she wouldn't come to the Supreme Court with prejudgment about its practices, and she made it clear that she would regognize her role as a newcomer. But she did say she "would be the new voice in the discussion, and new voices often see things and talk about them and consider taking new approaches."

So, ultimately, it was a non-answer, but Sotomayor did hint that she'd "consider taking new approaches," and it sounded like she may not mind cameras in the nation's highest court.

UPDATE: See video of the exchange below, courtesy of C-SPAN's video library:


Presented by

Chris Good is a political reporter for ABC News. He was previously an associate editor at The Atlantic and a reporter for The Hill.

The Best 71-Second Animation You'll Watch Today

A rock monster tries to save a village from destruction.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

The Best 71-Second Animation You'll Watch Today

A rock monster tries to save a village from destruction.

Video

The Case for Napping at Work

Most Americans don't get enough sleep. More and more employers are trying to help address that.

Video

A Four-Dimensional Tour of Boston

In this groundbreaking video, time moves at multiple speeds within a single frame.

Video

Who Made Pop Music So Repetitive? You Did.

If pop music is too homogenous, that's because listeners want it that way.

Video

Stunning GoPro Footage of a Wildfire

In the field with America’s elite Native American firefighting crew

More in Politics

Just In