Sotomayor Wouldn't Mind Cameras in Supreme Court?

More

Though cameras in the courtroom were by no means favored by Justice David Souter (he warned they'd have to "roll over my dead body" to get into the Supreme Court), it sounds like his potential replacement wouldn't mind them. Sonia Sotomayor gave a non-answer to Sen. Herb Kohl's (D-WI) question about cameras in the Supreme Court this morning, on the second day of her Senate confirmation hearing. She's had good experiences with cameras in her appellate courtroom when participating in experiments, she acknowledged today, and Sotomayor said she makes it a practice, when coming to a new court, to "understand and listen to my colleagues about why certain practices were necessary or helpful, or why certain practices were necessary or helpful, or why certain practices shouldn't be done or new procedures tried, and then spend my time trying to convince them."

Sotomayor said she wouldn't come to the Supreme Court with prejudgment about its practices, and she made it clear that she would regognize her role as a newcomer. But she did say she "would be the new voice in the discussion, and new voices often see things and talk about them and consider taking new approaches."

So, ultimately, it was a non-answer, but Sotomayor did hint that she'd "consider taking new approaches," and it sounded like she may not mind cameras in the nation's highest court.

UPDATE: See video of the exchange below, courtesy of C-SPAN's video library:


Jump to comments
Presented by

Chris Good is a political reporter for ABC News. He was previously an associate editor at The Atlantic and a reporter for The Hill.

Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

Tracing Sriracha's Origin to a Seaside Town in Thailand

Ever wonder how the wildly popular hot sauce got its name? It all started in Si Racha.


Elsewhere on the web

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Where the Wild Things Go

A government facility outside of Denver houses more than a million products of the illegal wildlife trade, from tigers and bears to bald eagles.

Video

Adults Need Playtime Too

When was the last time you played your favorite childhood game?

Video

Is Wine Healthy?

James Hamblin prepares to impress his date with knowledge about the health benefits of wine.

Video

The World's Largest Balloon Festival

Nine days, more than 700 balloons, and a whole lot of hot air

Writers

Up
Down

More in Politics

Just In