Code Conflict: Our Boss Joins Terrorism Alert Review Panel

A surprise to us here at the Atlantic Media Group: company owner David Bradley has been appointed to the Department of Homeland Security's new advisory panel on terrorism alerts.  Bradley is the only member of the media establishment on the 17-person panel, which will provide recommendations on whether to continue the Green-Yellow-Orange-Red color alert system within 60 days. The commission will be chaired by two well-respected GOP appointees -- ex-Bush homeland security adviser Fran Townsend, now chairman of the Intelligence and Security Alliance, and ex-FBI/CIA director William Webster. Other members include two governors, a member of the Heritage Foundation, several mayors, police chiefs, and the president of the Navajo nation. Recall that the Homeland Security Advisory System was instituted in 2002, and that the level changed 16 times through 2006; it's remained at "yellow" since Aug. 10, 2006. There has been plenty of reporting to suggest that Bush administration political officials clashed frequently about whether to raise alert levels -- usually the "don't raise it" side lost out. I've not had the chance to discuss this issue with Mr. Bradley, so I don't know where he stands.

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Marc Ambinder is an Atlantic contributing editor. He is also a senior contributor at Defense One, a contributing editor at GQ, and a regular contributor at The Week.

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