The Day In Politics, 6/1

Today, we learned that Sonia Sotomayor's former clerks are recommending her for SCOTUS confirmation; Democrats are hitting six Republicans for opposing the stimulus; the White House issued strict guidelines to reporters traveling to Riyadh; the GOP is whiter, demographically, than the Democratic Party; Nancy Reagan said President Obama could have scored points by inviting her to his stem cell announcement; Michael Moore said goodbye to GM; Obama recognized gay pride month; and Sarah Palin worries about the pro-life movement after the assassination of Dr. George Tiller.

We also meditated on the political challenges of restructuring GM; how much of the economy the government really owns (it's not much); CIA technology and its role in the surge; the speech debate around Tiller's assassination; and whether South Carolina stimulus spending will end up in the Supreme Court.

Tomorrow: Obama departs for Saudi Arabia; Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner is in China; the House votes on a resoultion recognizing the ""20th anniversary of the brutal suppression of protesters and citizens in and around Tiananmen Square"; Vice President Joe Biden holds a roundtable discussion with business leaders in New York on the stimulus; and the Senate votes on the confirmation of assistant EPA administrator nominee Regina McCarthy.

Presented by

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

A Stop-Motion Tour of New York City

A filmmaker animated hundreds of still photographs to create this Big Apple flip book

Video

The Absurd Psychology of Restaurant Menus

Would people eat healthier if celery was called "cool celery?"

Video

This Japanese Inn Has Been Open For 1,300 Years

It's one of the oldest family businesses in the world.

Video

What Happens Inside a Dying Mind?

Science cannot fully explain near-death experiences.

More in Politics

Just In