American Politics, With A New Skin

Just in time for the fourth of July, the Atlantic is pleased to unveil an easier-to-read, gently refurbished politics website. It'll be easier to see more content, more quickly, and it'll be easier to find content by your favorite authors. 


The site is curated by the Atlantic's political editor, Marc Ambinder, and features writing by Chris Good and contributions by Matt Cooper and other reporters. Bob Cohn, the Atlantic.com's editorial director, is the boss.

As always, our aim is to provide you with instant, forward-leaning analysis of the days events, with conceptual scoops that help you understand Washington and politics, and with a chronicle of the most active period of government in at least a quarter century. 

We're not automatons, and you'll see certain themes repeat themselves. Our quirkiness is one way we distinguish the site from our many worthy competitors. To borrow the favorite metaphor of jurisprudence, when we make judgments, we do as umpires or analysts, not as participants. 

The editors of this site are human and have political biases, but -- and this is important -- we are humble enough to know that there is rarely a right answer or a single perspective that explains it all. Don't mistake humility for relativity: we prize intellectual honest, clear thinking and plain speaking. 

We continue to be grateful for the time our readers spend on our site, and we hope that this reskin makes that experience a little more pleasant. 
Presented by

Marc Ambinder is an Atlantic contributing editor. He is also a senior contributor at Defense One, a contributing editor at GQ, and a regular contributor at The Week.

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