The Day In Politics, 5/18

Today we learned that President Obama will announce his SCOTUS nominee next week, according to administration officials; the House GOP continues its campaign against closing Guantanamo; the government is still resting on the state-secrets privilege in al-Haramain; Wolfram|Alpha doesn't know who Obama will nominate to SCOTUS; Judicial Confirmation Network is taking aim at three SCOTUS possibles; the Supreme Court refused to hear challenges to California's medical marijuana law; and that the ACLU is tired of the governent's "faux consultation."

We meditated on all of this, plus the "special relationship" between the U.S. and Israel; the impact of the Supreme Court's ruling in favor of John Aschcroft; and the coded language of Obama and Netanyahu.

Tomorrow: the Senate holds a preocedural vote on credit card reform; the House Energy and Commerce Committee marks up a revised energy bill; the Senate Foreign Relations Committee discusses cooperation with China on climate change.

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A New York City Minute, Frozen in Time

This wildly inventive short film takes you on a whirling, spinning tour of the Big Apple

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