The Day In Politics, 5/11

Today we learned that health care industry leaders are pledging to work toward President Obama's goals; Iran has freed journalist Roxana Saberi; Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari thinks the U.S. deserves some blame for the Taliban threat; an overhaul of the corporate tax code likely isn't on the way; embryonic stem cell research funding could impact the national electoral map; the Defense Department named a new top commander in Afghanistan; "socialism" is everywhere; and Rep. Pete Hoekstra wants the CIA to release more information about when and who it briefed in Congress on interrogations (that, or he wants more trouble for Democrats).

We deliberated on the meaning of all of this, plus whether it's okay to laugh at the jokes told at the White House Correspondents Association dinner; Obama's SCOTUS short list; what message Republicans will run on in 2010; and claims of a health reform renaissance.

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