Judicial Confirmation Network: Sotomayor Is A Discriminatory Activist

Judicial Confirmation Network (JCN), the conservative group that last week launched a campaign against three of what it perceived to be President Obama's "favorites" for the Supreme Court, this morning condemned Obama's nomination of appeals judge Sonia Sotomayor. As it did in a web ad against Sotomayor last week, JCN characterized her as racially discriminatory (a reference to her rejection of Ricci vs. Destefano); the group also accused her of being a judicial activist who thinks courts should make law (perhaps a reference to Sotomayor's comment that the court of appeals is "where policy is made.")

From JCN Counsel Wendy E. Long:

Judge Sotomayor is a liberal judicial activist of the first order who thinks her own personal political agenda is more important that the law as written.  She thinks that judges should dictate policy, and that one's sex, race, and ethnicity ought to affect the decisions one renders from the bench.

She reads racial preferences and quotas into the Constitution, even to the point of dishonoring those who preserve our public safety.  On September 11, America saw firsthand the vital role of America's firefighters in protecting our citizens.  They put their lives on the line for her and the other citizens of New York and the nation.  But Judge Sotomayor would sacrifice their claims to fair treatment in employment promotions to racial preferences and quotas.  The Supreme Court is now reviewing that decision.

She has an extremely high rate of her decisions being reversed, indicating that she is far more of a liberal activist than even the current liberal activist Supreme Court.
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Chris Good is a political reporter for ABC News. He was previously an associate editor at The Atlantic and a reporter for The Hill.

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