Geithner's Calendar, By The Numbers

The New York Times was kind to post a big PDF of Tim Geithner's schedule from when he was head of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, and I spent most of the morning wandering through it for items of interest. I've put some raw quantitative data -- who did he meet with, and how often? -- after the jump.

But the most interesting detail, in a way, is the dog that didn't bark: I can't find any mentions of Barack Obama, or Joe Biden, or transition head John Podesta in the entire schedule. There are a few scant references to meetings at the transition office -- about a half dozen in December and January -- but as far as I can tell there is no contact with the campaign or the president-elect before that, and no specific mentions of the president-elect at all. (The calendar runs from January 2, 2007 to January 11, 2009.) And since Geithner's November 4 schedule is packed from 7.30am to 7.15pm, I doubt the man had time to vote.


Other than that, there were, by my count:

--Fourteen meetings* with former Citigroup CEO Sandford Weill, who reportedly approached Geithner about becoming CEO of Citigroup himself. (Many of these meetings are private lunches.)

--Twelve meetings with Morgan Stanley CEO John Mack.

--Nine meetings with Goldman CEO Lloyd Blankfein.

--Eight meetings with former NYSE president and former Merrill Lynch CEO John Thain.

--Seven meetings with JP Morgan CEO Jamie Dimon.

--Seven meetings with former Lehman Brothers CEO Dick Fuld.

--Seven meetings with Citigroup CEO Vikram Pandit.

--Five meetings former Treasury Secretary and former Citigroup Chairman Robert Rubin.

--Five meetings with AIG CEO Edward Liddy.

--Three meetings with former AIG CEO Robert Willumstad.

--One "drink w/ Larry Summers." (Notable only because there is otherwise very little drinking on the schedule, and relatively little Larry Summers.)

--One tennis match with Alan Greenspan.

--One tennis match with two others and an unnamed "tennis pro"

--One listing of "Table Tennis Finals." (No word on whether Geithner was playing, or won.)

* I use "meetings" pretty broadly -- it incorporates everything from a conference call, to a reception dinner, to an intimate lunch. And I am totally open to the possibility that my count is wrong. The PDF repeats some calendar pages, and there are a lot of pages. 

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Conor Clarke is the editor, with Michael Kinsley, of Creative Capitalism. He was previously a fellow at The Atlantic and an editor at The Guardian. More

Conor Clarke is the editor, with Michael Kinsley, of Creative Capitalism, an economics blog that was recently published in book form by Simon and Schuster. He was previously a fellow at The Atlantic and an editor at The Guardian. He is also on Twitter.

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