What will get cut at the New York Times?

One more note about the cuts at the New York Times: most of the big staff cuts are on the business side, which supports the theory that the Times is holding out on meat and potatoes reporting cuts in the hopes of being the "last newspaper standing." (If it's the last one standing, presumably it won't need to struggle much for advertising revenue to support its large reporting staff.)

Where the cuts fall in the newsroom also support this theory. A friend texts:

The newsroom cuts will focus on Escapes, regionals and the New York Times Magazine. Those sections are the ones that are most based on freelancers. Escapes is depends on travel freelance or staffers writing for freelance money. The magazine is filled with contract workers  -- photo editors, stylists, writers, editors -- and regionals is is chock full of freelance writers.
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Conor Clarke is the editor, with Michael Kinsley, of Creative Capitalism. He was previously a fellow at The Atlantic and an editor at The Guardian. More

Conor Clarke is the editor, with Michael Kinsley, of Creative Capitalism, an economics blog that was recently published in book form by Simon and Schuster. He was previously a fellow at The Atlantic and an editor at The Guardian. He is also on Twitter.

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