With Stimulus Done, Labor Turns To EFCA

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With successful passage of the $787 billion stimulus package in their rearview mirror, organized labor is returining to their top political priority: convincing Congress and the President to pass and sign the Employee Free Choice Act, or card check, which would remove significant barriers to unionizing.  Labor's working with a coalition of Democratic allies, including the Center for American Progress Action Fund, which will release a  report tomorrow on the benefits of unionization for the U.S. economy.  The grassroots field campaign of the unions continues to be gradually ratcheted up; events will be held in 16 states. And labor is working nicely together: the state-based events are being done in complete coordination between AFL-CIO, Change to Win, and SEIU, who will be working in total coordination to pass the Employee Free Choice Act.

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Marc Ambinder is an Atlantic contributing editor. He is also a senior contributor at Defense One, a contributing editor at GQ, and a regular contributor at The Week.

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