Robert Samuelson is deeply disappointing

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He takes on the stimulus in the Washington Post:

Judged by his own standards, President Obama's $787 billion economic stimulus program is deeply disappointing. [...]

His politics compromise the program's economics. Look at the numbers. The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimates that about $200 billion will be spent in 2011 or later -- after it would do the most good.

This might be deeply disappointing to Robert Samuelson, but it is not deeply disappointing when judged by Obama's own standards. His own standard, as presented in the administration's metrics report on the stimulus, was that 75% of the bill be spent in the first 18 months. According to the CBO, 74.2251% of the bill Obama signed will be spent in that period. Perhaps Samuelson is worried about the errant 0.7749%, but I wouldn't characterize that as particularly disappointing or deep.

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Conor Clarke is the editor, with Michael Kinsley, of Creative Capitalism. He was previously a fellow at The Atlantic and an editor at The Guardian. More

Conor Clarke is the editor, with Michael Kinsley, of Creative Capitalism, an economics blog that was recently published in book form by Simon and Schuster. He was previously a fellow at The Atlantic and an editor at The Guardian. He is also on Twitter.
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