The subtle bipartisanship of Rush Limbaugh

Rush Limbaugh takes to the pages of this morning's Wall Street Journal in praise of what might some dittoheads might consider an unfamiliar notion: Bipartisanship. According to Rush, the stimulus bill didn't have enough of it:

Yes, elections have consequences. But where's the bipartisanship, Mr. Obama? This does not have to be a divisive issue. My proposal is a genuine compromise.

Rush then goes on to detail his amazingly wacky proposal -- namely, dividing the spending in the congressional bill based on the percentage of the presidential vote that each party won. Under Rush's plan, 54 percent of the stimulus money would go to "infrastructure and pork as defined by Mr. Obama and the Democrats." (Sounds fair.) And the rest of the money would go to a series of extreme tax cuts determined by ... Rush Limbaugh. Democracy lives to fight another day.


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Conor Clarke is the editor, with Michael Kinsley, of Creative Capitalism. He was previously a fellow at The Atlantic and an editor at The Guardian. More

Conor Clarke is the editor, with Michael Kinsley, of Creative Capitalism, an economics blog that was recently published in book form by Simon and Schuster. He was previously a fellow at The Atlantic and an editor at The Guardian. He is also on Twitter.

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