Open-Ended Commitments

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Of all the pro-college talking points out there, the one I find most baffling is the one offered by my colleague Herschel Nachlis, namely the idea that the NCAA game is somehow more open and free-flowing. I'm troubled by this critique precisely because I sympathize with it, but to me the worse offender here is the amateur game with its long shot clock and sluggish pace.

Now it's true that because NBA defenders have more tactical acumen, and are larger, stronger, faster, quicker and more experienced, that there is, literally speaking, less space in which for an offensive play to develop. But that lack of space aside, the vastly greater skill levels of NBA players allows them to run more efficient offenses against superior defense with a shorter shot clock and a longer three point line. To me, advantage: NBA.

Photo by Flickr user terren in Virginia

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Matthew Yglesias is a former writer and editor at The Atlantic.

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