Overclass Blues

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Daniel Gross brings some quality snark:

Conservative critics constantly carp that the culture of poverty has encouraged a sense of dependency on Washington. Of course, in recent months, the bureaucracy—the Federal Reserve, the Federal Housing Authority, Fannie Mae, and Freddie Mac—has generally ignored the struggles of poor homeowners. Yet it vaulted into action to save the bankers from their own disastrous bets. When Bear Stearns, the nation's fifth-largest investment bank, approached insolvency, the Feds orchestrated JPMorgan's acquisition of it.

Now of course there's a reason for that; the poor and the middle class aren't "too big to fail." Still, this is where basic issues of justice come in -- the Bush/McCain policy in this regard is simply outrageous. People in need deserve some help, too.

Photo by Flickr user Toni V used under a Creative Commons license

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Matthew Yglesias is a former writer and editor at The Atlantic.

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