Alphabet Rights

Of all the congressional candidates out there, Dan Grant is certainly the one with whom I've had the most fun drinking. On top of that, he has an impressive record of experience and level of knowledge with the key foreign policy issues the country's facing. In short, very much the kind of guy who I would have liked to see take a seat. But he lost the primary campaign and failed to secure the Democratic nomination in Texas' 10th congressional district. Kriston Capps explains that he was done-in in part by having the alphabetically-determined second spot on the ballot.

It's become cliché to describe something or other as the last acceptable prejudice, but discrimination against the alphabetically challenged isn't even a prejudice. It's just a brute fact of life that some of us need to put up with. I feel bad for Dan, but frankly a "Grant" doesn't know squat about drawing the short end of the alphabetical stick compared to an "Yglesias." Back in grade school, poor Rachel Zabarkes was at least behind me in line for everything, but a few years back she got married and traded up to "Friedman." For generations, Yglesiases have considered abandoning our gallego roots and switching to the more orthodox "Iglesias" but for everyone else suffering at the end of the alphabet I chose to stand my ground and fight for justice.

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Matthew Yglesias is a former writer and editor at The Atlantic.

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