Some Questions About Mitt Romney and Mormonism

Seems to me, before we can consider the political ramifications of the speech Mitt Romney intends to give, the political universe ought to grapple with a couple of fundamental questions.

(1) Generally, should the content of a candidates religious practice inform a voter's perception of a candidate?

(2) Are those who object to Mormonism on theological and doctrinal grounds religious bigots?

(3) Is a certain amount of "religious bigotry" necessary in a pluralistic democracy where people are encouraged to live according to their beliefs?

(4) Is there a difference between deciding not to vote for Mormon politicians and deciding not to rent a house to a Mormon family?

(5) Is Mormonism weird? Weirder that Christianity? Judaism? Atheism?

(6) Should candidates for office be forced to discuss and endorse the particular quirks of their faith?

(7) Is Mitt Romney proud of the tenets of his faith? Is he an orthodox Mormon? Are these questions appropriate?

(8) Is Mormonism objectively similar to widely accepted variants of evangelical Christian theology?

Ok, more than a couple.

Presented by

Marc Ambinder is an Atlantic contributing editor. He is also a senior contributor at Defense One, a contributing editor at GQ, and a regular contributor at The Week.

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