Times Change

"The group of World War II veterans kept a military code and the decorum of their generation, telling virtually no one of their top-secret work interrogating Nazi prisoners of war at Fort Hunt," reports Petula Dvorak for The Washington Post, "When about two dozen veterans got together yesterday for the first time since the 1940s, many of the proud men lamented the chasm between the way they conducted interrogations during the war and the harsh measures used today in questioning terrorism suspects."

Obviously, they just didn't understand the stakes. Or perhaps lacked moral clarity.

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Matthew Yglesias is a former writer and editor at The Atlantic.

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