Where the Bullets Go

Since 2013, Kathy Shorr has been traveling the U.S. photographing survivors of gun violence. Some of them were injured in mass shootings, others by their spouses, and still others by accident. But Shorr wanted to share more than images, she also wanted to share their stories. That's why subjects were asked to describe how they were wounded—and photographed in the place they were shot. “Most of these locations are banal and 'normal' places we all visit: shopping centers, places of entertainment, church, neighborhood streets, movie theaters, etc.” Shorr said.  “Gun violence is now something that most of us have a connection to.” She added that she doesn’t want her work to be divisive, saying that many of the survivors portrayed are gun owners. SHOT is more of a catalog of scars, both emotional and physical. “I hope to get people to start talking about what we have in common,” she said.

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