The Citizens of Nowhere

Greg Constantine has spent a decade photographing people with no documentation, and no rights. Working with various refugee groups and non-governmental organizations, Constantine has visited stateless communities in 18 countries—including Sri Lanka, Kenya, Kuwait, Crimea, Italy, and the Dominican Republic. 

His new book, Nowhere People, gives an unparalleled view of what it is like to be denied citizenship. "In most cases, they cannot work legally, receive basic state health-care services, obtain an education, open a bank account or benefit from even the smallest development programs," Constantine said. Without passports or any identification papers, these families typically cannot travel to pursue a better life, and at the same time, are at risk of deportation from their own homes. By capturing the lives of these stateless people on camera, Constantine creates a kind documentation that governments have long denied them.

Below is a selection of images from his book as well as captions provided by the photographer.

Read more
Hints: View this page full screen. Skip to the next and previous photo by typing j/k or ←/→.

Ads are being blocked

For us to continue writing great stories, we need to display ads.

Un-block Learn more
Back

Whitelist

Please select the extension that is blocking ads.

Back

Please follow the steps below

Most Recent

  • China Daily China Daily Infor / REUTERS

    Photos of the Week: 9/24-9/30

    Typhoon Megi in China, a fuel tanker afire off the coast of Mexico, the Surf Dog Competition in California, a mass skinny-dip in England, and much more.

  • John Moore / Getty

    On the Border

    The border between the United States and Mexico stretches 3,169 kilometers (1,969 miles), crossing deserts, rivers, towns, and cities from the Pacific to the Gulf of Mexico.

  • SIPA Asia via ZUMA Wire / Corbis

    The Beauty of Terraced Fields

    For thousands of years, when farmers in mountainous regions have expanded their farms to grow crops on the steep slopes, they have carved massive steps into the terrain.

  • Matthias Schrader / AP

    Fall Is in the Air

    It’s starting to feel like my favorite time of year once more—the autumnal equinox took place last week.

Join the Discussion