The 20th-Century Architecture of Eero Saarinen

In America's postwar years, architects and builders were redefining modernism, taking advantage of new construction techniques and materials to create a visual language for the 20th century. Finnish-American architect Eero Saarinen was amazingly prolific and successful throughout this era, designing projects large and small, from the Gateway Arch in St. Louis and the TWA Flight Center at New York's JFK Airport to community churches and individual homes. Photographer Balthazar Korab worked for Saarinen, skillfully capturing the nuances, shapes, and lines of his structures and documenting the creative process involved. In the process, he earned a reputation as a well-respected architectural photographer. Korab, who passed away earlier this year, graciously donated nearly 800 of these photographs to the Library of Congress in 2007.

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