The Crash of Asiana Airlines Flight 214

Last Saturday, July 6, Asiana Airlines flight 214 from Incheon, South Korea to San Francisco, crashed during a landing attempt at San Francisco International Airport. The flight was carrying 307 people, and most were able to evacuate safely, 182 were injured, and two Chinese students aboard were killed. The National Transportation Safety Board is at work, trying to determine the exact cause, but what is known so far shows that the aircraft was low and underspeed during its approach, and the tail section appears to have clipped the seawall at the end of the runway, as the Boeing 777 struck the tarmac hard. This collection of images contains many photographs from passenger Eugene Anthony Rah, who was documenting the scene as he fled the aircraft.

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