Millions March in Egyptian Protests

One year after the inauguration of Egypt's Islamist President Mohammed Morsi, millions of Egyptians marched in city streets and squares across the country, calling for Morsi to resign. Hundreds of thousands of Morsi supporters held competing demonstrations, in some cases, clashing with opponents. Two years after people power toppled the dictatorship of Hosni Mubarak, Egypt's young democracy remains crippled by bitter divisions, as many of those responsible for Mubarak's downfall have been shut out of Morsi's administration. Fears of violence remain high, with Morsi's Islamist supporters vowing to defend him -- 16 have been killed already. Egypt's powerful armed forces gave Morsi an ultimatum today, demanding he share power, urging the nation's feuding politicians to agree on an inclusive roadmap for the country's future within 48 hours, or the military would take unspecified actions.

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