Brazilian Police Evict Indigenous Squatters from 2014 Stadium Site

As Brazil prepares to host the 2014 World Cup, massive construction and reconstruction is taking place, and residents living near stadium sites have faced a series of evictions and relocations. In Rio de Janeiro, a group of indigenous people have been squatting in abandoned structure near the famous Maracana Stadium since about 2006. The building, formerly an Indian museum, is now slated for demolition, making way for a planned 10,000-car parking lot, part of the $500 million renovation of Maracana Stadium. The indigenous group and their supporters staged numerous protests over the past year, trying to halt the planned eviction, but lost their battle on March 22, when hundreds of police officers in riot gear surrounded the building. A tense 12-hour standoff took place, as supporters outside the building were tear-gassed and arrested. By the end of the day, police were able to forcibly remove all members of the community from inside the building.

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