A Bloody Week in Libya

Libyan leader Muammar Qaddafi still retains power in the capital city, Tripoli, but has apparently lost much or all control of several towns to the east and a few to the west. As government opponents step up their demonstrations and are joined by dozens of defecting military and diplomatic officials, Qaddafi seems to be digging in -- issuing defiant speeches, reportedly employing foreign mercenaries to crack down on the opposition, and threatening even more bloodshed, despite international condemnation. The Libyan government has officially banned foreign journalists from the country, so reports and images are difficult to come by. Some, however, are still making their way out. Collected here are images from around Libya during the past week.

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