The Atlantic Grows Single Copy Sales 28% in First Half of 2014, Hits Record Audience at TheAtlantic.com

Washington, D.C. (August 12, 2014)—Single-copy newsstand sales of The Atlantic jumped 28 percent for the first half of 2014, even as the industry as a whole reported a drop of 11.9 percent in the same period, according to the Alliance for Audited Media.  In addition, TheAtlantic.com is reporting record audience for the month of July, delivering 17.8 million total unique visitors for the month. Atlantic co-presidents, Editor-in-Chief James Bennet and COO Bob Cohn, released the audience numbers today.

There’s just a lot of demand out there for powerful ideas-driven journalism,” said Bennet. “Our writers and editors, in the magazine and on the site, are drawing a tremendous response from readers on subjects as diverse as the accumulating burden of racism, and the unintended consequences of risk-averse parenting. And our design team, led by Darhil Crooks, is simply blowing the doors off, from our covers to our digital features to the animated trailers they’re creating for each issue.”

While there was consistent growth in newsstand sales across The Atlantic’s first five issues of the year, the June cover story, “The Case for Reparations” by Ta-Nehisi Coates, sold 60 percent more copies than its 2013 counterpart and set a single-day record for audience to a magazine story on TheAtlantic.com. Other issues featured cover stories about the age of anxiety, the trouble with fraternities, and overprotective parenting.

Two issues are on newsstands now: a commemorative edition for World War I, and The Atlantic’s annual Ideas issue (July/August 2014), this year themed creativity under the banner “How Genius Happens.” In the Ideas issue, writers explore the secrets of extraordinarily creative brains, debunk the myth of the lone genius, and reveal the surprising origin stories behind innovation. The special issue, World War I: How the Great War Made the Modern World, is a collection of pieces by some of the greatest writers of the time, along with new takes on this war, and how it shaped the world today. The September issue of The Atlantic releases Thursday.

The audience record for July at TheAtlantic.com bests the previous high for the site, set in March 2014. TheAtlantic.com is the award-winning flagship digital property of The Atlantic, home to the magazine and ten topical channels, covering politics, business, tech, entertainment, health, education, the sexes, national and global news, and Atlantic Video. Audience was distributed across all channels, with eight writers having more than half a million readers last month, and more than 40 writers topping 100,000 readers.

Overall, audience to TheAtlantic.com has increased by more than 80 percent since July 2012. A new traffic record was also set in June by Atlantic Video, which has seen video plays triple in two years.

TheAtlantic.com has offered extensive coverage and commentary about domestic politics and international affairs, focusing heavily on Gaza, Syria, Iraq, Ukraine and Russia; other recent pieces have explored why poor schools fail at standardized tests, anti-surveillance camouflage to throw off facial-recognition technology, and polyamorous relationships.

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For media inquiries, please contact:

Sydney Simon
The Atlantic
ssimon@theatlantic.com
202-266-7338

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