The Atlantic Presents 'American Futures': A Conversation With James and Deborah Fallows on Travels to Small Town America

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Washington, D.C. (April 1, 2014)—In their “American Futures” series for The Atlantic, National Correspondent James Fallows and his wife, linguist and author Deborah Fallows, explore America by their propeller-driven plane—documenting the dramatic economic, cultural, and social changes happening in small towns and cities across the country. Since August 2013, and with James as pilot, the couple has traveled from one small-town airport to the next to meet the people and stories that are shaping America’s heartland, and impacting a nation.

The Fallowses will touch down at Sixth & I Historic Synagogue to share the stories they’ve uncovered of reinvention and resilience during a special event presented in partnership with The Atlantic on Wednesday, April 16 at 7PM (ET). Tickets are available now.

During the conversation, Atlantic Co-President and Editor-in-Chief James Bennet will interview James and Deborah about this immersive reporting project, what they’ve discovered, and where they have yet to go. James Fallows’ most recent dispatch in the series, in the April issue of The Atlantic on newsstands now, makes a case for why cities work when Washington doesn’t—strong mayors—with Greenville, South Carolina, and Burlington, Vermont, as case-in-points.

“American Futures” is the most recent in a series of events hosted by The Atlantic and Sixth & I, building on a long-standing history between the two organizations. Past events have featured the cover stories “Why Women Still Can’t Have it All” and “All the Single Ladies.”

DATE & TIME:
Wednesday, April 16, 2014
6:00 p.m., ET: Doors open
7:00 p.m., ET: Program begins
8:00 p.m., ET: Program concludes

LOCATION:
Sixth & I Synagogue
600 I Street, NW
Washington, D.C. 20001
Tickets: $15
Purchase by phone: (877) 987-6487

Press Releases

For media inquiries, please contact:

Anna Bross
The Atlantic
abross@theatlantic.com
202-266-7714

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