Inside The Atlantic's May 2014 Issue

The May 2014 issue of The Atlantic is now available online—with features, dispatches, and essays summarized and provided below:

Cover Story: The Confidence Gap
A growing body of evidence shows that, at work and in life, confidence matters just as much as competence when it comes to getting ahead. The problem, argue the broadcast journalists Katty Kay and Claire Shipman in The Atlantic's May 2014 cover story, is that women are less self-assured than men—and that this persistent disparity between the genders is what keeps women from achieving at the highest levels. Women often hold themselves back: compared with men, they don't consider themselves as ready for promotions, they predict they'll do worse on tests, and they generally underestimate their abilities. Kay and Shipman outline the science and culture behind this predicament, and how to rectify it. The authors also chat withAtlantic National Correspondent Hanna Rosin about "why men assume they're so great" in a video at TheAtlantic.com. Read more

Segregation Now ...
In an exposé, The Atlantic, teaming with ProPublica, finds that many schools across the nation are quietly resegregating. As mandates to integrate schools are lifted, poor black students are being sequestered into schools of their own through gerrymandering, white flight, and in some cases, the actions of the cities' black elites—essentially re-establishing the divide of decades past, with similarly devastating effects. ProPublica's Nikole Hannah-Jones heads to Tuscaloosa and finds that its school district, once the model of racial integration, has moved back in time, such that "nearly one in three black students attend a school that looks as if Brown v. Board of Education never happened." Meet students and staff at Tuscaloosa's Central High School, in a short documentary at The Atlantic's Video Channel. Read more

The Pope in the Attic
It has been more than 600 years since we last had a living ex-pope. An autoclaustrato, Pope Benedict now lives a quiet life in Rome just a few hundred yards from the papal apartments, and must watch as Pope Francis, the successor he enabled, dismantles much of his legacy. In an in-depth profile, Paul Elie talks with those who work closely with both Popes about how Benedict's exit and Francis's rise is spurring even greater tensions between a traditional Church and a progressive world. Read more

The Money Report:

Africa's Tech Edge: The mobile-money service M-Pesa has revolutionized the transfer of money in Kenya. 

Dayo Olopade explains why Africa is years ahead of Silicon Valley in this area—and the benefits that companies in the U.S. may want to cash in on. Read more

The Pirate EconomySince the early 2000s, robbery off Africa's eastern coast has gone berserk. The Atlantic's Joe Pinsker charts the costs of piracy, from the private security hired to defend ships, to the markup pirates pay on the stimulant khat. 

Read more

Where the Card Sharks FeedAfter the Justice Department targeted online-poker operators, many amateurs, known to poker pros as "fish," have been wading back into casinos—where they are becoming easy bait for sharks. 

David Samuels watches this play out hook, line and sinker, from one of the hottest new poker rooms on the East Coast. Read more

Press Releases

For media inquiries, please contact:

Anna C. Bross
Senior Director, Communications, The Atlantic
202-266-7714
abross@theatlantic.com
@AnnaCBross

Sydney Simon
The Atlantic
ssimon@theatlantic.com
202-266-7338

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