Inside The Atlantic's December Issue

The dispatches, articles, columns, and essays in The Atlantic’s December issue include:

They’re Watching You at Work
What happens when Big Data meets human resources? As Don Peck reports in this month’s cover story, the emerging practice of “people analytics” is transforming the way employers hire, fire, and promote people. New technologies are enabling HR departments to move away from qualitative-based hiring and management methods to quantitative, data-driven ones: the use of specialized “badges” that transmit detailed information about employees’ interactions as they go about their days, algorithms that assess workers’ potential, personality-revealing video games. Think Moneyball for the office. If that sounds scary, Peck explains why it’s actually a good thing—for businesses, and employees.

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John Kerry Will Not Be Denied
When John Kerry succeeded Hillary Clinton as secretary of state in February, the consensus in Washington was that Kerry was a boring if not irrelevant man stepping into what was becoming a boring, irrelevant job. Yet his nine months at the State Department have been anything but boring—and no one can argue his lack of relevance: He has brokered a deal with Russia to remove chemical weapons from Syria, revived the Israeli-Palestinian peace process, started hammering out a post-withdrawal security agreement with Afghanistan, and embarked on a new round of nuclear talks with Iran. In a wide-ranging profile, David Rohde talks with the secretary of state, as well as those closest to him, to reveal a complex portrait of a man whose critics call him arrogant, undisciplined, and reckless, and yet whose relentless pursuit of negotiations might produce some of the most important diplomatic breakthroughs in years.

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Have a Safe Riot!
The U.S. prison population has exploded over the past 40 years—yet the number of inmate uprisings has plummeted. Joseph Bernstein’s visit to the annual Mock Prison Riot—where the jailers of the world come together to share new ideas and technologies—reveals the riot-suppression tactics that have so dramatically reduced prison disorder and violence. There is one tactic, though, almost never publicly discussed: the development of elite security squads trained to preempt and put down prison disorder of every kind. While certainly effective, have these now-ubiquitous Correctional Emergency Response Teams stifled the voices of some genuinely mistreated prison inmates?

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The Quest to End the Flu
Every year, the flu virus mutates, forcing scientists and drugmakers to scramble to produce new vaccines using slow and sometimes unreliable methods that were pioneered nearly 80 years ago. But new viruses threaten to outwit and outrun them, and can cause millions of deaths. As Carl Zimmer reports, researchers have finally found a way to ramp up production faster than ever—and even have in sight a single shot that could offer lifetime protection.

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The Home Remedy for Old Age
The fastest-growing and most-expensive portion of our Medicare population consists of elderly, chronically ill patients, many of whom need medical attention for years, if not decades. Our health-care system wasn’t designed to cope with this reality and hasn’t shown much interest in adapting to it. But now that’s changing, reports Jonathan Rauch, thanks in part to a recognition that not all health care has to be medical care.

Press Releases

For media inquiries, please contact:

Anna C. Bross
Senior Director, Communications, The Atlantic
202-266-7714
abross@theatlantic.com
@AnnaCBross

Sydney Simon
The Atlantic
ssimon@theatlantic.com
202-266-7338

How to Cook Spaghetti Squash (and Why)

Cooking for yourself is one of the surest ways to eat well. Bestselling author Mark Bittman teaches James Hamblin the recipe that everyone is Googling.

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How to Cook Spaghetti Squash (and Why)

Cooking for yourself is one of the surest ways to eat well.

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Before Tinder, a Tree

Looking for your soulmate? Write a letter to the "Bridegroom's Oak" in Germany.

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The Health Benefits of Going Outside

People spend too much time indoors. One solution: ecotherapy.

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Where High Tech Meets the 1950s

Why did Green Bank, West Virginia, ban wireless signals? For science.

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Yes, Quidditch Is Real

How J.K. Rowling's magical sport spread from Hogwarts to college campuses

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Would You Live in a Treehouse?

A treehouse can be an ideal office space, vacation rental, and way of reconnecting with your youth.

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