A Parisian Interlude

In these Paris dispatches, I have tried to explain what the long and slow acquisition of French (still ongoing) has meant to me. I've also talked about what language study could potentially mean to young folks who grew up, as I did, in a community where multilingualism is not an explicit goal. In pursuing multilingualism with my wife and son, one thing I've been noticed is that there is money out there for kids to learn foreign languages--Arabic in particular seems to attract a lot of funding. 

If you are a parent and are interested in any sort of language immersion--or any other opportunities regarding language--please send me an e-mail. I'll give you all the leads I have, and more as they come in. My address is my first initial attached my last name; the domain is the magazine I work for.

When we come up in spaces of limited opportunity there are things we can't see. More than that, even when we see these things we often perceive them as being beyond our budget. But our perception is not always the reality. There are opportunities out there. If any parent is any way inspired to take this path with their child, I will gladly do all I can to help. Drop me a line. 

 

Ta-Nehisi Coates is a national correspondent at The Atlantic, where he writes about culture, politics, and social issues. He is the author of the memoir The Beautiful Struggle.

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