New Video Evidence in the Fadi Quran Case

More

There is now a second video of the arrest of Palestinian activist Fadi Quran, taken from a new and illuminating angle. It tends to corroborate the drift of the first video--that Fadi, though reportedly charged with shoving or assaulting an Israeli soldier, didn't do anything that could be reasonably construed as that.

If you haven't seen either video, it's probably best to watch the original video first:

The newer video, below, starts with Fadi, his back to the camera, tending to an acquaintance (maybe someone who has been pepper sprayed?). The argument between Fadi and the soldiers seems to start when one of the soldiers tries to clear out some space at Fadi's expense. Fadi protests, but he is clearly backing up, ceding ground, as he does so. Yes, he is gesturing vigorously as he speaks, but he certainly isn't the aggressor.

I don't see any way the reported allegation against Fadi--assaulting or shoving a soldier--could hold up in the face of this evidence. Fadi is expected to undergo some sort of legal procedure on Monday. I don't know if it's a formal bringing of charges or a trial before an administrative judge or what. But it wouldn't surprise me if he is released soon and charges are dropped. Surely some of this video has by now come to the attention of Israelis handling the case. And maybe they've become aware, too, that a case involving Fadi, a Stanford graduate, would get more scrutiny than the average case. (Here's a page curated by Jake Horowitz, a Stanford friend of Fadi's, that posts updates on Fadi's situation.)

Jump to comments

Robert Wright is the author of, most recently, the New York Times bestseller The Evolution of God and a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. He is a former writer and editor at The Atlantic. More

Wright is also a fellow at the New America Foundation and editor in chief of Bloggingheads.tv. His other books include Nonzero, which was named a New York Times Book Review Notable Book in 2000 and included on Fortune magazine's list of the top 75 business books of all-time. Wright's best-selling book The Moral Animal was selected as one of the ten best books of 1994 by The New York Times Book Review.Wright has contributed to The Atlantic for more than 20 years. He has also contributed to a number of the country's other leading magazines and newspapers, including: The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, Foreign Policy, The New Republic, Time, and Slate, and the op-ed pages of The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The Financial Times. He is the recipient of a National Magazine Award for Essay and Criticism and his books have been translated into more than a dozen languages.

Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

An Eerie Tour of Chernobyl's Wasteland

"Do not touch the water. There is nothing more irradiated than the water itself."


Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Is Technology Making Us Better Storytellers?

The minds behind House of Cards and The Moth weigh in.

Video

A Short Film That Skewers Hollywood

A studio executive concocts an animated blockbuster. Who cares about the story?

Video

In Online Dating, Everyone's a Little Bit Racist

The co-founder of OKCupid shares findings from his analysis of millions of users' data.

Video

What Is a Sandwich?

We're overthinking sandwiches, so you don't have to.

Video

Let's Talk About Not Smoking

Why does smoking maintain its allure? James Hamblin seeks the wisdom of a cool person.

Writers

Up
Down