The Oakley Dog Done With 2011

Oakley Done with 2011.png

(photo credit:  Russell Totten; click for larger image)

Readers at The Atlantic and The Washington Note are different pots of readers -- but as we approach 2012, I'm going to mix it up a bit. 

These three pups -- Buddy on the far left, Annie in the middle, and Oakley the Amazing Weimaraner (google him) -- have a very large following at TWN and folks at this Atlantic Voices page will see more of them in 2012. 

I love dogs and most other pets -- well, except snakes.  Had a garter snake named Chernenko once -- and things got ugly.

Oakley has his back turned towards 2011 in my view and seems eager to get on with a new year.

Me too. 

Steve Clemons is Washington editor at large for The Atlantic and editor of Atlantic Live. He writes frequently about politics and foreign affairs. More

Clemons is a senior fellow and the founder of the American Strategy Program at the New America Foundation, a centrist think tank in Washington, D.C., where he previously served as executive vice president. He writes and speaks frequently about the D.C. political scene, foreign policy, and national security issues, as well as domestic and global economic-policy challenges.

Never Tell People How Old They Look

Age discrimination affects us all. Who cares about youth? James Hamblin turns to his colleague Jeffrey Goldberg for advice.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Never Tell People How Old They Look

Age discrimination affects us all. James Hamblin turns to a colleague for advice.

Video

Would You Live in a Treehouse?

A treehouse can be an ideal office space, vacation rental, and way of reconnecting with your youth.

Video

Pittsburgh: 'Better Than You Thought'

How Steel City became a bikeable, walkable paradise

Video

A Four-Dimensional Tour of Boston

In this groundbreaking video, time moves at multiple speeds within a single frame.

Video

Who Made Pop Music So Repetitive? You Did.

If pop music is too homogenous, that's because listeners want it that way.

Just In