Wallenstein Is Dead, Cont.

More
Burghers2.jpg

There's a hazy line between my posts arguing that the Civil War wasn't tragic, and my posts on the 30 Years War. The key dilemma I'm trying to wrestle with is how we should think about war, given its consistency throughout history, its horrible consequences, and the tendencies of people to canonize, in varying degrees, its practitioners. 


Is war tragic? And if so, given that war exists throughout the whole of human history, does calling war "tragic" neuter the condemnation? Is there a such thing as a "good" or "just" war? Was the Civil War a "just" war? Was World War II? Bosnia?

My sense is that these questions are neither original or new. I don't open this thread to seek answers--the questions are too big. But I wonder if anyone among the Horde can recommend thinkers, anthropologists, historians, ethicists, writers etc. who've looked at these questions. I understand much about the narrative. I'm more interested in how intellectuals have processed the meaning of it all.

I continue to argue that the Civil War wasn't tragic. But that's easy, indeed almost neccessary, for me to say. Indeed it's actually too easy. Please offer any essays or books you think might help here. And as always, think before speaking. Just because you can talk doesn't mean you should.

Closing comments for a bit, before we start.
Jump to comments

Ta-Nehisi Coates is a national correspondent at The Atlantic, where he writes about culture, politics, and social issues. He is the author of the memoir The Beautiful Struggle. More

Born in 1975, the product of two beautiful parents. Raised in West Baltimore -- not quite The Wire, but sometimes ill all the same. Studied at the Mecca for some years in the mid-'90s. Emerged with a purpose, if not a degree. Slowly migrated up the East Coast with a baby and my beloved, until I reached the shores of Harlem. Wrote some stuff along the way.

Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

Sad Desk Lunch: Is This How You Want to Die?

How to avoid working through lunch, and diseases related to social isolation.


Elsewhere on the web

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Where Time Comes From

The clocks that coordinate your cellphone, GPS, and more

Video

Computer Vision Syndrome and You

Save your eyes. Take breaks.

Video

What Happens in 60 Seconds

Quantifying human activity around the world

Writers

Up
Down

From This Author