Responding to Andrew's Atlantic Anger-Blogging

Andrew Sullivan writes:

Jeffrey Goldberg, for one, hails his corporate overlords. But Jeffrey Goldberg doesn't know that much about new media. I know that sounds odd, given that he is a blogger at what was once one of the savvier new media websites, but there you have it. One of the many reasons I don't engage his blog more frequently on matters relating to new media is that he's not very knowledgeable about the dynamics of blogging as a form, or of the radical new democracy of online personal voices which render institutional authority and corporate branding so exhausted and old-school. This might be because these issues don't interest him. But his endorsement of this almighty mess could not be put more eloquently than this: (Sorry, I can't seem to load his page right now, seriously -- I'll put in the link as soon as I can).
Linking on the web. Who needs it?

Actually, I was making fun of the fact that the Daily Dish wouldn't load this morning. I've now discovered that this supposed "technical malfunction" was caused by AIPAC. And the Human Rights Campaign. And Hillary Clinton.

As for Andrew's more substantive points: I don't like capitalism too much, either, but I have no reason to believe that my "corporate overlords" are trying to fuck us over. They're trying, quite hard in fact -- from the over-overlords all the way through the ad salespeople -- to keep this business afloat, and I'm grateful, both for the paycheck and for the ability to travel to report on stories, and yes, for this platform. As for this comment: "One of the many reasons I don't engage his blog more frequently on matters relating to new media is that he's not very knowledgeable about the dynamics of blogging as a form, or of the radical new democracy of online personal voices which render institutional authority and corporate branding so exhausted and old-school," let me just say this: Huh? Why would someone engage my blog on "matters relating to new media"? I don't write about new media. Mostly I write about Jews. Occasionally Arabs. Sometimes Persians. Every so often Walmart. And baseball. And my 401(k). But that's about it.

I'm all for platforms that provide opportunities to read "online personal voices which render institutional authority and corporate branding so exhausted and old-school." (Though if by institutional authority he means "fact-checking," then I'm for institutional authority). But I don't think that attacking co-workers who are trying in good faith to make The Atlantic a better magazine, in print and on-line, is particularly useful. In other words, going to war over unfortunate font changes isn't necessary.

UPDATE: Yes, yes, I get that Andrew was echoing the language I used to describe his knowledge, or comparative lack of knowledge, of the Middle East.  The difference is that I really don't write about the new media and he really does write about the Middle East. 

Jeffrey Goldberg is a national correspondent for The Atlantic and a recipient of the National Magazine Award for Reporting. He is the author of Prisoners: A Story of Friendship and Terror. More

Before joining The Atlantic in 2007, Goldberg was a Middle East correspondent, and the Washington correspondent, for The New Yorker. He was previouslly a correspondent for The New York Times Magazine and New York magazine. He has also written for the Jewish Daily Forward and was a columnist for The Jerusalem Post.

Goldberg's book Prisoners was hailed as one of the best books of 2006 by the Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Slate, The Progressive, Washingtonian magazine, and Playboy. He received the 2003 National Magazine Award for Reporting for his coverage of Islamic terrorism and the 2005 Anti-Defamation League Daniel Pearl Prize. He is also the winner of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists prize for best international investigative journalist; the Overseas Press Club award for best human-rights reporting; and the Abraham Cahan Prize in Journalism.

In 2001, Goldberg was appointed the Syrkin Fellow in Letters of the Jerusalem Foundation, and in 2002 he became a public-policy scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C.

Video

The Best 71-Second Animation You'll Watch Today

A rock monster tries to save a village from destruction.

Video

The Case for Napping at Work

Most Americans don't get enough sleep. More and more employers are trying to help address that.

Video

A Four-Dimensional Tour of Boston

In this groundbreaking video, time moves at multiple speeds within a single frame.

Video

Who Made Pop Music So Repetitive? You Did.

If pop music is too homogenous, that's because listeners want it that way.

Video

Stunning GoPro Footage of a Wildfire

In the field with America’s elite Native American firefighting crew

From This Author

Just In