Percival Lowell

  • Mars
    Corbis

    Mars

    As telescopes brought Earth’s planetary neighbors into closer view, Lowell, an astronomer, proffered a bold theory about the nature of faint lines glimpsed on the surface of the Red Planet. They were, he deduced, irrigation canals built by intelligent Martian life forms. Though his colleagues were skeptical, Lowell’s conjecture helped popularize the field of astronomy, and his later work—his search for “Planet X”—paved the way for the discovery of Pluto.

  • Mars

    Suggestive of irrigation as the strange network of lines that covers the surface of Mars appears to be, the suggestion takes on more definite…

  • Mars

    In the last paper we saw how badly off for water Mars, to all appearance, is; so badly off that any inhabitants of that other world would have to…

  • Mars

    "To determine whether a planet be the abode of life, two questions about it must be answered in turn: first, are its physical conditions such as to render it habitable? And secondly, are there any signs of its actual habitation? Unless we can answer the first point satisfactorily, it were futile to seek for evidence of the second."

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